Why are we still paying for computers and Internet services when we’re so far removed from our phones?

If you’re still paying the bills after the Internet is gone, there’s an easy solution: Put your phone on your shoulder.

That way, your phone and computer are always in the same place, keeping you safe from the prying eyes of the people who still use them.

But the idea behind it is simple: keep your phone, or at least the part of it that can be used to make calls and texts, from getting smashed up.

That’s because smartphones have made using a phone so much more convenient than it used to be.

Here’s how: The iPhone and Android phones can be easily switched into a silent mode, where only the screen is visible.

This means the phone won’t ring.

You can also toggle on silent mode by tapping the volume up and down buttons.

This will lock the phone’s screen so it won’t make a noise.

That sounds pretty scary, but it doesn’t mean your phone won

How to protect your computer from a cyber attack

India’s largest telecom operator, Bharti Airtel, said on Thursday that it was installing software to detect and block all malicious links on all of its networks.

The company, which is a joint venture between Reliance Communications and Infosys, said that it had deployed its “Malwarebytes” antivirus software and that it would also block malicious links and redirections in its Internet traffic.

The move is part of the company’s ongoing effort to improve its security posture after the cyber attacks of February that crippled the nation’s telecoms and other infrastructure.

India’s telecom operators have been on a roll in recent years to tackle the spread of malware and ransomware, which has infected at least one billion devices.

However, the government and telecom operators often disagree on how to tackle cyber attacks.

Bharti Aetel, India’s second-largest telecom operator and one of the country’s largest Internet service providers, said in a statement that its malware detection and blocking software, known as Malwarebytes, was installed to combat cyber attacks and block malicious content.

MalwareBytes detects and blocks all malicious and phishing websites, links, phishing emails, malware samples and malware downloads, the company said.

The software, which can be installed on computers, smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices, can detect and prevent malicious websites, link phishing attacks, malware download sites, and malware-infected websites.

Malicious websites can also be blocked by the software.

The latest software was released in March and is available on Android and iOS devices, as well as on the desktop and the web, the statement said.

The software can be downloaded for free from the company.

Bharti is the latest in a series of Indian telecom operators to implement a similar security measure.

In May, the Telecom Regulatory Authority of India (Trai) announced that it will set up an independent cyber security team to deal with cyber attacks on its network.

In August, it also announced the establishment of a Cybersecurity Centre of Excellence in its headquarters.

The Airtels’ MalwareBytes is just one example of the efforts the company is making to protect its customers and staff.

In May, AirtEL announced a cybersecurity plan that included a new website, Malwarefree, and a new email, Malicious email, to ensure that staff are kept up-to-date on all the latest threats and to monitor any suspicious activities.